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[-----], hospital, 2nd Corps, Army of Northern Virginia, in Louisa County, Virginia, to his wife, possibly in North Carolina, regarding his work in the 2nd Corps hospital in Louisa County, noting one patient with smallpox, and commenting that the overall number of sick in the hospital is down. Billie also comments on his duties and other military matters. Letter, 2 January 1865, from a soldier named Billie at Petersburg, Virginia, to his sister Maggie describing the wintery weather conditions around Petersburg during the siege of 1864-1865. The Navy had received information from runaway slaves, but the Navy was too late to prevent the burning, and that Confederate forces had burned other vessels and some bridges during a retreat. Tom also requests socks, letter paper, envelopes, a necktie, and a knife. View the catalog record [Confederate States of America. [-----] of the United States Navy to his mother describing a run his flotilla made to Fredericksburg, Virginia, to try to prevent Confederate forces from burning some vessels. Letter, 19 March 1863, from Tom [-----], a Union solder at Winchester, Virginia, to his mother, discussing a march to West Virginia to vote on the new state constitution, the illness of his father who is in the same company as the author, and the confiscation of a rebel wagon. history of the 17th Virginia regiment detailing the movements of the regiment in campaigns of 18. Topics covered include the weather, picket duty, skirmishes with the enemy, building fortifications, taking prisoners, and various battles in which the unit participated in at Suffolk, Glade Springs, New Bern, and Drewrys Bluff. Grant (1822-1885), attempts led by General Benjamin F. Letters, 30 November-23 December 1864, written by a Confederate soldier named Henry [-----], in the Army of Northern Virginia likely in Chesterfield Couny, Virginia, near the Jame River, to his brother Tom commenting on Henry's homesickness and longing for the war's end, his sense of satisfaction at the sight of Northern dead, a Union ironclad assault on the Howlett Line, the general expectation of an impending attack by General Ulysses S. Letter, 16 October (no year), from Henry [-----], a Union soldier possibly in a New York company, to Catharine thanking her for her letter and discussing picket duty, his attendance at religious meetings, arrest of a drunk provost guard, and other news. Letter, 26 February 1865, to James [-----] from Tait[? He also mentions the arrival of Mc Clellan's Army to reinforce General Pope's Army. Letter, 23 August 1862, from Judson [-----] at the Mansion House Hospital, Alexandria, Virginia, to Sarah, writing about his health, taking care of the wounded at the hospital, amputations, and his weariness of the war.

Burnside (1824-1881), and sending other news including information on the sick and dead. Extracts from a history, December 1864, of the 17th Virginia Infantry, detailing the movements of the unit during the period 14 February 1863 to 25 June 1864. Records concern raising and organizing troops in Virginia and Maryland, appointment of officers, construction of fortifications, dispatching of troops and supplies, the military use and defense of railroads, the capture and removal of machinery at the Harpers Ferry arsenal, and efforts to defend Richmond and Manassas Junction. Letter, 15 December 1862, from Samuel [-----] in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to his brother serving in the Union army, congratulating his brother on his promotion and requesting money to help settle an estate. He comments that the girls of Fredericksburg are very pretty and he regrets that the flotilla is returning to the Potomac River. Thomas adds that the flotilla had captured other vessels on the Rappahannock River, and that Union troops, under General Irvin Mc Dowell had arrived in Fredericksburg. Letter, 1862, from Lucen [-----] in Richmond, Virginia, to his father, regarding the high prices of clothing and shoes, and his work and pay as a clerk in the Medical Directors office in Richmond. Contains descriptions of the number of soldiers aboard ship, the James River and the shoreline along the James River, food and living conditions aboard ship, and participation in military operations south of the James River between Petersburg and Richmond. Letter, 6 November 1864, from Richard [-----], in the Officers' General Hospital Ward 2, near Fort Monroe, Virginia, to his wife Libby in Lynn, Massachusetts, discussing his stay in the hospital, other patients, his hope of receiving a leave of absence or of being transferred to a Massachusetts hospital, and his family.


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